The Target Audience

Students viewed and analyzed the Dr. Pepper movie in the previous post. We searched Youtube for a few of their favorite ads. We viewed them and discussed the purpose of the ads and the target audience for each. We also briefly talked about the various techniques of each. They searched for others ads on Youtube that they enjoy watching. They emailed the link to me and shared what they found interesting for each. The following are the ads they sent to me.

Note: Most of these links no longer work. Most have been removed from Youtube for copyright infringement.

  • Women’s College Basketball Championship on ESPNI like this video because I love basketball and I can relate to all of the basketball in the commercial. The commercial is also very intense and talks about competition and aggression. I’m very interested in the intense basketball moments of the commercial. (Camelle)
  • Volkswagen – This commercial appeals to me because I used to do weird things like that when I was a kid. (Brandon) I like this commercial because it is a combination of two of my favorite things: comedy and little kids.  It includes so much within one minute and two seconds. In the end the child is deceived into thinking that he has the force. (Michelle J)
  • Kia – I love this commercial because it appeals by the melody of the sound track and the fun characters which in this case are hamsters. (Evelyn)
  • Dwyane Wade’s New T-Moble NBC commercial – This appeals to me because it shows me the features of that phone. It helps us know what is cool about the phone and it makes you want to buy it. (Anthony)
  • Allstate – This as appeals to me because it happens all the time and it’s funny because it’s suppose to be a kid but it’s a man. (Elizabeth)
  • MacDonald – This McDonald’s commercial appeals to me because it shows two of the best basketball players in the NBA competing for a meal from McDonald’s. They are doing crazy dunks and impossible moves that inspire people. This also appeals to me because those impossible dunks keep me watching and entertained during the commercial. (Nick)
  • Dorito – This commercial appeals to me because i like Doritos. It is funny and helps you remember to ask your friends if they “saw the Doritos commercial.” (Hunter) This commercial is my favorite commercial because its very funny. Also, it proves the point how good doritos are and how addicting they are. This commercial makes me want to buy some doritos. It is also in good camera quality with the scenes and the face shots. (Jessica)
  • Doritos – (Devin) I love this commercial because doritos are my favorite chip, and i also think it is hilarious because they steal the chips, and then the guy is dressed as a dorito samuri.(Riley)
  • Windex – This commercial appeals to me because of its humor. In my house we do a lot of cleaning so seeing the Windex commercial just makes it so much fun. (Kendall)
  • Chrysler – Eminem and Detroit – This video appeals to me because it shows how Detroit came back from a lot of unluckiness. It also has Eminem. I like Eminem. (Nicole)
  • Rajon Rando Foot LockerThis advertisement catches my attention because of its intensity. It is based around hard work and commitment and that appeals to me because of my devotion to athletics. (Ariel)
  • Bud Light I love this commercial because it makes the man look all cool, but then he realizes she has a cat and starts sneezing fire. (Emmanuel)
  • Bud Light Stranded – This makes fun of the show “Lost” and promotes Bud Light as the sheer sign of a good time. (Francisco)
  • Doritos – It’s really funny how the little boy is protecting his mom and his Doritos. That’s why I like it because it is funny. (Kiersten) This video symbolizes a kid’s authority and how he can be persuasive. This catches my attention because it targets me and my age group. (Andre) I love this commercial because the little boy is cute and hilarious.  Also, I like the commercial because they remembered to use the rule of thirds.  I think the idea for the commercial was very clever. (Ailene)
  • Gatorade – This commercial appeals to me because I like sports and Gatorade. The beat is really hypnotizing. (Aimee)
  • Gatorade – I like this commercial because it shows my liking for basketball and the liking for my favorite basketball team and my favorite player for the Orlando Magic. (Andrew)
  • Geiko – I like this because it is funny and dumb.(Michele)
  • Life Water – Sobe Thriller Lizard Dance – This commercial is appealing to me because, it’s funny and it makes me want to get up and dance. I think that it is a good attention and eye grabber because of all of the colors. (Ashley)
  • Subway I like this commercial because I love how they changed the voices and I was just waiting for the guy to throw the first punch for the sandwich. (Alyna)
  • Subway This is a funny commercial because the people’s voices are little kids’ voices and the one guy says that the guy with the Subway sandwich can’t use his basketball hoop trash can. (Juliana)
  • State Farm I like this video because it’s funny. It is also well thought out.(Eleeza)
  • Skittles This commercial appeals to me because it is so random. Why would an old man need a shock from a giant sock man? No reason. It’s just amusing in that sense. (Blake)
  • Zoosk How does this video appeal to me? This video appeals to me because the dart man was called an “athlete,” even though darts is not a real sport. After the “Kachow!”, he hits the guy drinking beer, his head hits the table, then he falls to the ground. I could just watch that over and over again! (Jacqueline)
  • Cheetos I love this commercial because it starts off with the guy dancing and it really draws you in. It makes you think, “I wonder what in the world this is about…”, so you immediately want to watch more of it. Then, just when you think they can’t be dorkier, their manager walks up and asks them straight out if their having a party. They say no and close the door on him, even though he can obviously see everything their doing. The music also drew me in from the beginning because the beat is funny and the way the guy is dancing…hysterical. I crack up every time I see, wishing I could watch it again. (Arianna)
  • MioI like this commercial because I love how the different colors swirl around in the water. I think the song they use goes perfect with this commercial because since you can choose how much you’d like of the enhancer, the songs lyrics are matching. (Nicole)
  • Chips Ahoy I think that the commercial is very funny because the cookies are being eaten while they are singing “Don’t You Want Me Baby”.  It also kind of makes me think that the cookies are tired of being unwanted and just want to become a snack. (Kevin)
  • Dr Pepper This commercial is promoting the Dr. Pepper fountain drink. This commercial appeals to me because I love Dr. Pepper and Gene Simmons. Genne Simmons is part of the band KISS, which is one of my favorite bands, so this makes me want to go buy it because he likes it too. This commercial is entertaining, comical, and easy to watch. That is why I love the Dr. Pepper commercial! (Samanth S)
  • Pawn Stars I really enjoy this show and this commercial catches my attention. I believe it represents the show well by showing the four main “Pawn Stars” and the music while being very catching is also describing the show by saying “Lets make a deal, lets make a real deal”. Also it is showing customers and their items, some being very interesting making you want to tune in to the show to see that item and its story. (Armondo M)

Analyzing Commercials

View the Dr. Pepper commercial below. Assess the technical elements:

  1. number of shots
  2. length of each shot
  3. camera angle of each shot & location of the camera for each
  4. effects of close-up/medium/long shots
  5. framing (rule of thirds)
  6. backgrounds
  7. lighting for each shot
  8. visual transitions
  9. sound track
  10. special effects or animation
  11. script/message

Discuss the following:

  • Who created the message?
  • What is the target audience?
  • What creative techniques are used to attract attention?
  • How might different people understand this message differently?
  • What values, lifestyles and points of view are represented in, or omitted from, this message?
  • Why is this message being sent?

Dr. Pepper Commercial Quicktime Version (Recommendation: Watch it several times without the sound to focus on elements #1-8 above.)

DrPepper

Paraphrase – Cyberbullying

When you paraphrase or restate information in your own words, it helps you to understand and to remember the information. You can paraphrase you what have heard as well as information you have read.
  1. Listen to the information about Cyberbullying on BrainPOP.
  2. Open a new text document in OpenOffice. Enter your name at the top of the document.
  3. Write a detailed summary of the information you heard in Cyberbullying. Do not copy and paste. Write the summary in your own words. Include the following
    1. the definition of a cyberbully
    2. why people become cyberbullies
    3. what you can do if you know it is happening to you
    4. what can you do if you know someone is cyberbullying another person
    5. use these terms in your summary (all were used in the BrainPOP video)
      1. rumor (a story or statement talked about as news without any proof that it is true)
      2. depression (sadness, low spirits)
      3. self-esteem (self-respect)
      4. nausea (the feeling that one might vomit)
      5. host – on the Internet (company that provides the Internet service)
      6. evidence (anything that shows what really happened, the proof)
      7. harassment (being troubled by repeated attacks)
      8. anonymous (by a person whose name is unknown or given)
      9. impersonate (pretend to be someone else)
  4. Use complete sentences, correct spelling, grammar and punctuation.
  5. Copy and paste the statement below at the bottom of your summary,

    As per the Student-Parent Handbook (pg. 35), “Cyberbullying” is one of the many forms that inappropriate behaviors can take. Therefore, those students participating in cyberbullying can be punished by the school.

  6. Place the final document in the Cyberbullying dropbox.

Practice Paraphrasing – Cyberbullying

When you paraphrase or restate information in your own words, it helps you to understand and to remember the information. You can paraphrase what you have heard as well as information you have read.
  1. Listen to the information about Cyberbullying on BrainPOP.
  2. Open a new text document in OpenOffice. Enter your name at the top of the document.
  3. Write a detailed summary of the information you heard in Cyberbullying. Do not copy and paste information. The summary should be in your own words. Include the following
    1. the definition of a cyberbully
    2. the effects of being bullied
    3. why people become cyberbullies
    4. what you can do if you know it is happening to you
    5. what can you do, and should you do if you know someone is cyberbullying another person
    6. use these terms in your summary:
      1. rumor (a story or statement talked about as news without any proof that it is true)
      2. depression (sadness, low spirits)
      3. self-esteem (self-respect)
      4. nausea (the feeling that one might vomit)
      5. host – on the Internet (company that provides the Internet service)
      6. evidence (anything that shows what really happened, the proof)
      7. harassment (being troubled by repeated attacks)
      8. anonymous (by a person whose name is unknown or given)
      9. impersonate (pretend to be someone else)
  4. Use complete sentences, correct spelling, grammar and punctuation.
  5. Copy and paste the statement below at the bottom of your summary,

    As per the Student-Parent Handbook (pg. 35), “Cyberbullying” is one of the many forms that inappropriate behaviors can take. Therefore, those students participating in cyberbullying can be punished by the school.

  6. Place the final document in the Cyberbullying dropbox.

Paraphrase Practice – Health Topics

Grades 6 and 7

  1. When “an idea is expressed in a complicated way, it can help to think about how you would explain it to somebody else. Retelling something in your own words, or paraphrasing, also helps you to remember what you read.”  Paraphrasing (Time for Kids)
  2. Select one of the articles on Staying Healthy to read or listen to.
  3. Open a new OpenOffice text document. Enter your name and the name of the article you read.
  4. Write a paragraph summary of the information, paraphrasing the information in your own words.
  5. Write in complete sentences using correct punctuation and grammar. Spell all words correctly.
  6. Select and Copy the URL of your source information website. Go to EasyBib. Paste the URL of the information source website into EasyBib to create a bibliography entry. Add an annotation. Select and copy the bibliography entry and the annotation.
  7. Paste the bibliography entry with annotation into the OpenOffice document. Make sure it is a hanging indent paragraph.
  8. Add a bullet note under the bibliography entry with annotation indicating how you know this is a valid source of information.
  9. Go back to the summary you wrote. Cite the source of the information using a parenthetical citation.
  10. Save the document in My Documents. Name the document with your last name and Health (for example, Smith Health)
  11. Place the document in the Paraphrase Health assignment in the class dropbox on Sycamore.

*** View ICS Digital Help Web Search Strategies ***

Citation Practice: Goodbye, Space

  1. Read this article on Goodbye, Space!.
  2. Open a new text document in OpenOffice.
  3. Write a summary of the article in your own words. Do not use any quotations.
  4. Create a bibliography for the article using EasyBib.
  5. Paste the bibliography entry into the OpenOffice document. Make sure it is a hanging indent paragraph.
  6. Add a bullet note under the bibliography entry with annotation indicating how you know this is a valid source of information.
  7. Go back to the summary you wrote. Cite the source of the information using a parenthetical citation.
  8. Place this in the Goodbye Space dropbox assignment.

Sample Student Work (Grade 7)

Discovery
by Dylan S.

 

The space shuttle Discovery has just gone on its last trip into space. It went to the International Space Station to add new storage space. Now that Discovery has been retired it will be added to the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. (Zimbler)

Bibliography

Zimbler, Suzanne. “Time for Kids | News | Goodbye, Space!” Time For Kids | Classroom. 09 Mar. 2011. Web. 17 Mar. 2011. <http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/kids/news/story/0,28277,2058053,00.html>.

  • I know it is a valid website because it is on Time magazine’s website, Time magazine is a well known magazine

 

Space
by Tyler S.

The space shuttle Discovery was working in space for 27 years carrying astronauts. The space shuttle was been on 39 missions going to space and back. Discovery’s final trip was to the International Space Station. Since 1998, 16 nations have been working together to build the space base 220 miles above Earth.365 days in space and has traveled a whopping 148 million miles since 1984.After 30 years NASA, plan is to begin work on new spaceships that can travel longer distances. Endeavor, another shuttle, is scheduled to make its final voyage next month. Museums across the country have requested the retired shuttles. (Zimbler)

Bibliography

 

Zimbler, Suzanne. “Time for Kids | News | Goodbye, Space!” Time For Kids | Classroom. 09 Mar. 2011. Web. 17 Mar. 2011. <http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/kids/news/story/0,28277,2058053,00.html>.

  • This is a good website because it is a news company

Research Skills

Enduring Understandings:

  1. Information systems, both printed and digital, are the centers of intellectual, academic, social, and cultural life.
  2. Not all information is valid, reliable, relevant, or appropriate.
  3. Technology can facilitate learning when it enables students to explore ideas, solve problems, and derive meaning.

Research Skills

  1. Questioning: Frame questions to focus an inquiry. Write open research questions.
  2. Planning: Determine and plan research strategies appropriate for the research question. Determine appropriate primary and secondary sources of information. Use topics, keywords, directories. Sample Sources: the library, atlases, maps, graphs, visual sources, oral sources, on-line databases, the Internet, simulations, case studies, etc.
  3. Gathering: Collect and record authentic, relevant information from a range of reliable and valid primary and secondary sources. Evaluate and annotate information sources. Record information by: note taking, determining what is important/relevant, summarizing, enciphering & interpreting.) (See Successful Internet Searches and Evaluating Information Sources
  4. Sifting & Sorting & Analyzing: Use a variety of methods to sort, organize, process, integrate, and analyze information. Use graphic organizers. Use the writing process. Compare and contrast data. Make tables/graphs. Make maps. Create a visual-picture/cartoon.
  5. Synthesizing & Evaluating: Create new meaning and understanding, supported by evidence from information found. Write a statement supported by tables, graphs, maps, visual images, etc. Back up statements with citations.
  6. Reporting: Communicate clear, relevant and well substantiated arguments and findings using conventions appropriate to  the mode of communication. Provide written documentation. Give an oral presentation. Use visual images to support findings. Combine text with audio and visual to create a multimedia product.
  7. Citing: Use appropriate APA or MLA format methodology to cite reference sources and create a bibliography Annotated each information source with a statement providing proof that the resources is a valid and reliable resource to use.
Note: I’ve used these essential understandings for several years. I’m not sure what the original source was.

Efficient Internet Searches

Tip #1: Search in more than one search engine.

What you use to search depends on your topic.

The list on NoodleTools provides an excellent summary of places to look depending on your research topic:

Kid-Safe Search Engines

Frequently Used Search Engines

  • Google
  • Yahoo!
  • Bing
  • Ask
  • Alta Vista
  • Technorati is a search engine that searches blogs. Example of use: Technorati is a better place to find information about “Alan November” than Google because if you search for him in Google, the top 8 links are owned by Alan November, so most of the information was written by Alan November. In the blogs you can read what people are saying about Alan November, not what Alan November is saying about himself.

Tip #2: Use advanced search techniques. Use essential keywords and Boolean (Not/Or/And) strategies.

By using a variety of commands in Google Advanced Search, you can narrow searches for more appropriate information. Try these Google Search helps:

  • Phrase search “” – By putting double quotes around a set of words, you are telling Google to consider the exact words in that exact order without any change. For instance, “evaluate information sources” results in different web pages than evaluate information sources.
  • Search within a specific site – Google allows you to specify that your search results must come from a given website. For example, the query [ iraq site:nytimes.com ] will return pages about Iraq but only from nytimes.com.
  • Terms to exclude (-) – Attaching a minus sign (the NOT operator) immediately before a word indicates that you do not want pages that contain this word to appear in your results. For instance, a search for Jordan results in very different results than a search for Jordan -basketball.
  • Fill in the blanks (*) – The query [ Obama voted * on the * bill ] will give you stories about different votes on different bills. Note that the * operator works only on whole words, not parts of words.
  • Search exactly as is (+) – By attaching a + immediately before a word (remember, don’t add a space after the +), you are telling Google to match that word precisely as you typed it. Putting double quotes around a single word will do the same thing.
  • The OR operator – Google’s default behavior is to consider all the words in a search. If you want to specifically allow either one of several words, you can use the OR operator (note that you have to type ‘OR’ in ALL CAPS). For example, [ San Francisco Giants 2004 OR 2005 ] will give you results about either one of these years, whereas [ San Francisco Giants 2004 2005 ] (without the OR) will show pages that include both years on the same page. The symbol | can be substituted for OR. (The AND operator, by the way, is the default, so it is not needed.)

Tip #3: The hits at the top of a search list in a search engine such as Google or Bing are not always the best sources of information.

Google ranks websites on the number of links to a site and on the number of times a site is visited. Frequency does not equal quality or validity.

Also remember that those at the top of a Google or Bing search hit list and those on the right side are advertisements for web sites. The owners of those sites have paid to be at the top or right side of the search engine hit list. In Google these are labeled Ads. In Bing they are labeled Sponsored sites.

Tip #4: Read the information in the hits before clicking on a link to the web site.

Does the language and depth of information seem appropriate for your research purpose?

*** For additional information see Evaluate Information Sources ***

Practice Evaluating Website

Assignment: Use the 5W’s and the tips on Evaluate Information Sources to compare the following pairs of websites.

Collaboration: Work in pairs to decide which website you could use to write a report for a science class. Keep track of the steps you take to evaluate each web site. One person in each pair is in charge of keeping the notes, but both students are responsible for making sure the information is accurate. Both students must agree on the final evaluation of the websites. An Essential Tip is use Common Sense!

Topic 1: Endangered Species

  1. American Alligator
  2. Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus

Topic 2: Crops

  1. California Velcro Crop under Challenge (1993)
  2. Mandarin Orange

Topic 3: Early Explorers

  1. About Explorers
  2. Explorers

Topic 4: The Solar System

  1. The Solar System
  2. MoonBeam Enterprises

Topic 5: Robots

  1. History of Robots
  2. A Short History of Robots

Topic 6:  A Dangerous Chemical

  1. Ban DHMO: Dihydrogen Monoxide
  2. Facts about Dihydrogen Monoxide

Additional Topics (from Kathy Schrock’s list)

Evaluate Information Sources

ICS information technology students are required to annotate bibliography entries using the following5W’s” to prove the validity and reliability of information used.

  • Who wrote and who owns or sponsors the information? Is the author an expert on the topic?
  • What is the purpose of the site? What information is included. Does this information support or differ from information on other sites?
  • When was the site created, updated, or last worked on?
  • Where does the information come from? Is the information copied from another web site and is it correctly cited? Where can you find more information about the sponsor for the site?
  • Why is the information useful for your purpose? Why should you use this information? Why is the information on this page better than information on other pages?

The “5W’s” above are based on Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educators
The tips below are based on November Learning Information Literacy Resources and on Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educators

See Efficient Internet Searches for a list of search engines and efficient search techniques.

Tip #1: Use the URL to identify the domain name and web extensions and what they represent.

URL is an acronym for Uniform Resource Locator. The domain name is located after the http:// in the URL. For instance, the domain name for Incarnation Catholic School is icstampa.org. The domain name for Incarnation Catholic Church is icctampa.org.

The extensions in the URL provide additional clues to the identify and authorship of a website.

  • .org – organization
  • .com – company
  • .sch – school (used outside of US)
  • .k12 – most US school sites
  • .edu – US higher ed
  • .gov – US government (add country code for outside US)
  • .ac – higher ed outside of US usually used with country code, example, “.ac.uk”
  • .net – network
  • .mil – US military
  • .co – Company (if paired with a country code, example “.co.uk,” the state of Colorado or the country, Columbia)

For a list of country codes view Web Country Codes.

Tip #2: Truncate the URL.

Truncate
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html

to http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/ to learn that the information is hosted on and part of the University of California Berkeley Library web site. Knowing the documents are part of the official Berkeley library gives it authenticity.

Practice Truncating: What is the domain for each of the following:

Tip #3: Observe the URL grammar.

If a tilde (~), %, or a person’s name or the word “user” after the domain name is in the web address, it is a personal directory and not an official part of the website. In the following example, http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml, the information on plagiarism is in the personal directory of wts. It is not part of the official indiana.edu website. This means the information must be evaluated based on the information contained within the web page, and is not automatically valid because it appears to be on a university web site.

Identify the web grammar elements in this URLs. What is the domain? Who created each web page? Is each an official part of the domain website?

Tip #4: Find who links to a site.

In Alta Vista use the “link web addess” command. This shows who links to the site and also shows how many sites link to the site. Look at the Ova Prima site, then use link www.ovaprima.org in Google or link:www.ovaprima.org in Alta Vista search windows to how many and what type of sites link to the Ova Prima site.

Tip #5: Check the grammar, spelling, punctuation, vocabulary and tone of the information on the article.

Are the grammar, spelling and punctuation accurate? These provide clues to the accuracy of the information. Do the vocabulary and tone of the information provide clues to the purpose of the web site? Is the purpose to inform, to entertain, to persuade? Is the site based on fact or opinion? Is there a strong bias on the topic.

Tip #6: Determine the quality of the information.

Does the author indicate the original sources of the information? Does the author correctly cite information taken from other sources? Does the author provide links to cites with supporting information? Does the information contradict information you found elsewhere? Do you disagree with information on the page? Are you positive the information is true?

Tip #7: Determine if the information is up-to-date.

Is there a date on the page telling when the page was created or updated? What are you researching? How recent should the information be for your purposes?

Tip #8: Study historical information about a site.

Use Way Back Machine at www.archive.org to find the history of a site. Enter the URL of the site in question. You can see when the website was revised. If you have a link that is no longer active but you know the URL, you can enter the URL in Way Back Machine to view the contents. Think about the implications for FaceBook and MySpace users! Yes. What you put on today will still be sitting on some computer, possibly years from now.

*** For additional information see Practice Evaluating Websites and Efficient Internet Searches ***